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How to Use Comparative and Superlative Adverbs for English

Comparative and Superlative Adverbs

The English Language


The Explanation

Comparatives and superlatives adverbs are used to compare two or more things or people. Most comparative and superlative adverbs use "more" and "most" because they end in "ly".

The example of some of the ‘-ly’ ending adverbs that would use "more" and "most" are- easily, bravely, properly, rudely, boldly, fairly, kindly, lightly, tenderly, weakly, softly, etc


E.g.:

  • The girls played more boldly than the boys

  • Sam sings most softly of all the contestants


E.g.:

  • Jenny speaks most carefully of all the students.

  • Mary expresses more happily than John does.



Rules to use the Comparative and Superlative Adverbs

  1. Many adverbs can have three different forms, the positive, the comparative, and the superlative:


2. A Comparative adverb is used to compare two things, people or places. It’s used to state that the action performed is to a higher degree within a group or of its kind.

e.g.:

  • Jenny jumps higher than Sally

  • Clara is singing more quietly than her competitor

3. A superlative adverb is used to compare three or more people, places, or things. It’s used to state that the action performed is to the highest degree within a group or of its kind. They are sometimes preceded by the word “the” but not always.

e.g.:

  • Bill finished the food quickest.

  • Chris walks most slowly among all the students.

  • The boys in the front laugh loudest at a comedy show.


How to use comparative & superlative Adverbs

1. For the adverbs which retain the same form as the adjective, we simply add -er to form the comparative and -est to form the superlative.


e.g.:

  • Jim gets home earlier than his sister.

  • Jim gets home the earliest of all the family members


2. For irregular adverbs or exceptions, we used the standards word for the comparative and superlative forms.


e.g.:

AdjectiveAdverbComparative AdverbSuperlative Adverbgoodwellbetterbestbadbadlyworseworstfarfarfarther/furtherfarthest/furthest


  • She did worse in the game than her counterpart did.

  • My ball went the farthest of all in the game

  • Sallie plays cricket better than Jack does








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